up

Anchored

Anchored

Anchored in the City

If you are out and about in Hamburg, you will invariably encounter its University.

In addition to the 5 campuses, there are numerous individual locations for research, teaching, and learning. More than 60,000 University members fill the roughly 160 buildings with life. Some of these buildings are hidden from view, others are impossible to overlook, some are older than the University itself, and still others are just now being built. The University uses some buildings temporarily and it has used some since its founding.

Although entry to high-security labs is strictly regulated, all of the University’s museums are open to the public. The University’s activities are not restricted to its offices, lecture halls, classrooms, and student cafés— some are even open air!

1201

Why does the building at Allende-Platz 2 have so many windows?

To use the former bunker as a universitybuilding, about 100 openings were blowninto the facade in 1950. The large number was a result of the British occupation forces’ regulations on de-fortifying bunker complexes. The Zoological Institute was the first to move in. Today the Institute of Soil Science resides behind the thick walls. The team from Building Services Headquarters also starts out on their service calls from here. The City of Hamburg erected the bunker in 1940, more or less in the same spot as the Bornplatz Synagogue, which had been deliberately destroyed.
The building standing at Allende-Platz 2 in 1951 during structural alteration works
Staatsarchiv Hamburg, Foto: Willi Beutler, 720-1-/343-1/00014504
Renovations on the former bunker, 1951
„Synagogenmonument“ from the bird's eyes view
Margit Kahl
„Synagogenmonument“ by Margrit Kahl (1942–2009)
1202

Dangerous game

Earth is home to an estimated 8 to 9 million species, but researchers have only classified a fraction of them. The animal world is a network of vital relationships. The loss of any species is thus like a game of Russian roulette, as the consequences are unpredictable. You can learn more about biodiversity at the University’s Zoological Museum in the Center of Natural History. The exhibition and a broad array of events offer many opportunities to learn about biodiversity and how it is endangered.
Collection about the biodiversity among ladybugs
Universität Hamburg, Regionales Rechenzentrum / Medienkompetenzzentrum, Foto: Arvid Mentz
Biodiversity among ladybugs (Coccinellidae), 2016
Universität Hamburg, Regionales Rechenzentrum / Medienkompetenzzentrum, Foto: Arvid Mentz
1203

A house for earth

The ideal house offers protection and space for communal living. What is necessary for the Earth to remain such a place? What effects does climate change have on our lives and our coexistence? Researchers and students will explore questions like these in a new, modern building on Bundesstraße. The University’s Department of Earth Sciences, the interdisciplinary Climate, Earth and Environment cluster of excellence, and the Center for Earth System Research and Sustainability are expected work together here under one roof starting at the end of 2020.
Architect’s rendering of the Haus der Erde (House of the Earth)
Foto: HTP Hidde Timmermann Architekten GmbH / Bloomimages
Architect’s rendering of the Haus der Erde (House of the Earth), 2014
1204

Antiquity in the bakery

Here is a larger-than-life caryatid in her pleated gown, there the upper body of a sphinx stretches into the room. These and many other ancient figures await interrogation by archaeology students and researchers in their temporary domicile, a former bakery. Plaster casts make it possible to study ancient sculptures far from their actual locations and studying them in 3D, rather than from photographs, yields different results. Artists also like to use this special space to practice drawing.
View of statues from the Archaeological Institute’s plaster cast collection, 2012
Universität Hamburg, Regionales Rechenzentrum / Medienkompetenzzentrum, Foto: Arvid Mentz
View of the Archaeological Institute’s plaster cast collection, 2012
anonym
anonym
Universität Hamburg, Regionales Rechenzentrum / Medienkompetenzzentrum, Foto: Arvid Mentz
1205

Betting on the right horse

In 1928 the Senate of the City of Hamburg bought the building that once belonged to Europe’s largest manufacturer of luxury carriages and remodeled it for the University. Students and teaching staff in the social sciences now work where more than 200 horses were once stalled on 2 floors. The building also houses the University wood-working shop, printers, a café, and the Unikontor information center and shop. In the early years, the German scholar Agathe Lasch, the psychologist William Stern, and the philosopher Ernst Cassirer worked and taught in the Pferdestall—though they had to make do without the delicious coffee from the Ponybar.
The Pferdestall, shortly after it was built
Universität Hamburg, Arbeitsstelle für Universitätsgeschichte
The Pferdestall, shortly after it was built, 1908
1206

Game, set, match

You can still practice your serve at the University, but the 7 tennis courts on the grounds of the University’s Sportpark are a thing of the past. Today the Sportpark consists of 4 gymnasiums, a fitness center, and a large playing field with a track around it.

It is used by University Sports and the Institute of Human Movement Science. Students study here to become coaches, sports instructors, and sports management specialists.

The former University tennis courts, around 1960
Universität Hamburg, Arbeitsstelle für Universitätsgeschichte
The former University tennis courts, around 1960
View of the newly built gym hall, about 1960
Universität Hamburg, Arbeitsstelle für Universitätsgeschichte
View of the newly built gym hall, about 1960
Universität Hamburg, Arbeitsstelle für Universitätsgeschichte
1207

Temporary housing

The former Shell headquarters in the City Nord rises 12 stories into the air. The University has used 7 floors of this building since 2017 while the Philosophenturm on the Von-Melle campus is being renovated. Researching, teaching, and studying the humanities in an office complex has ist peculiarities, such as the security gate at the entrance and the unusually long trips between City Nord and the main campus. The Üterus does its best to conjure up some campus feeling, with space for student life between sofas, a bar, and a foosball table.
Temporary quarters at Überseering 35, 2017
Universität Hamburg, Foto: Susanne Wohlfahrt
Temporary quarters at Überseering 35, 2017
1208

In the catacombs of the museum of medical history

The tiled tunnel runs like a secret passageway from the museum, formerly the pathology institute, under the medical campus. It originally connected the new pathology building with the old one, where there was a chapel until 1943. This is how bodies were transported when family members came to say their last farewells. The pathology institute’s morgue had an ingenious cooling system, the heart of which was an ice machine. The more than 1-meter-long rods of ice were placed under the autopsy tables. The historical mortuary is open for viewing on special occasions.
Underground connection, 2011
UKE Hamburg-Eppendorf, Medizinhistorisches Museum Foto: Adolf-Friedrich Holstein
Underground connection, 2011
1209

Refuge on Rothenbaumchaussee

The best way to the garden is through one of the sunrooms, which still boast the original tiled walls. There and on 4 floors, the former apartment building for those with “discriminating tastes” offers international visiting researchers at the University a place to work and enjoy relaxed conversation with colleagues. In addition to the 50 small apartments and the International Lodge’s common rooms, the Salomon Birnbaum Library for Yiddish Language and Literature and the (Post-)Colonial Legacy of Hamburg / Hamburg and Early Globalization research center are located here, filling the building with life.
Original tiles from the founding period
Universität Hamburg, Gästehaus, Foto: Reimo Schaaf
Original tiles from the founding period, 2012
1210

The urban dweller’s bucolic fantasy

This garden—an idyllic, symmetrical landscape of herbs, fruit, vegetables, and boxwood hedges—is designed to reflect traditional rusticity. It is a stereotype, however, that bears little resemblance to reality. The idea took root among the bourgeoisie in the wake of increasing industrialization at the dawn of the 20th century. In 1913, the Hamburg Botanical Garden, which has been a part of the University since its founding, was the first to create this kind of idealized cottage garden. Today the garden in Klein Flottbek still entices visitors to enjoy a leisurely stroll and admire nature’s diversity.
Entrance to the Low German cottage garden in Klein Flottbek
Universität Hamburg, Loki Schmidt Garten
Entrance to the Low German cottage garden in Klein Flottbek, around 2000
1211

A journey to the interior of matter

If you are interested in the tiniest particles and the ultrafast processes in which they play a role, you are in the right place. And in 2020, this will become an entire new city district—Science City Bahrenfeld—replete with places to live, research, and relax. The physics institutes and the University’s clusters of excellence are already working fruitfully together and with other scientific institutions such as DESY and its underground particle accelerators. The next generation of scientists is also welcome to attend the University’s school lab Light & Schools.
Using lasers to make molecular films about the movement of the tiniest particles
UHH, The Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging/Institut für Laserphysik Foto: Peter Garten
Using lasers to make molecular films about the movement of the tiniest particles
1212

Base.Camp to coffee machine

A homemade mini computer will soon be responsible for communication with the life-sustaining coffee machine in the creative lab of the Department of Informatics. Beyond this basic measure, students in the Department are writing apps to investigate racist speech or teach you about the animal that went into your sausage. A scientific team helps the enterprising programmers realize their ideas. It helps them network among each other and with other researchers, including those outside their own disciplines and the University.
Homemade mini computer to process verbal instructions
Universität Hamburg, Fachbereich Informatik, base.camp, Foto: Eugen Ruppert
Homemade mini computer to process verbal instructions, 2019
1213

Hamburg Ahoi!

For over 50 years, students have been able to learn how to sail at Universität Hamburg. Courses offer roughly 1,000 participants a chance to gain their first experience on board or hone their sailing skills. The pilothouse is located on Isekai, just a short bike ride from the pier and its boat houses. Both the pilothouse and pier on the banks of the Außenalster belong to the University and provide all University members with an extraordinary free-time opportunity. Students of human movement can take courses close to town.
A look at the boat workshop at the sailing pier
Universität Hamburg, Institut für Bewegungswissenschaft Foto: Stephan Szczepaniak
A look at the boat workshop at the sailing pier, 2019
Universität Hamburg, Institut für Bewegungswissenschaft Foto: Stephan Szczepaniak
Universität Hamburg, Institut für Bewegungswissenschaft Foto: Stephan Szczepaniak
Universität Hamburg, Institut für Bewegungswissenschaft Foto: Stephan Szczepaniak
1214

Moonstruck in Bergedorf

Astrophysicists who worked at the Hamburg Observatory at the beginning of the 20th century usually also lived here. Nighttime observation required short distances between bedroom and telescope, so life and work were closely connected, at least in terms of space. Researchers continue to work here today.

The compelling landscape with its Baroque Revival domed buildings is not simply one of the three locations maintained by the Department of Physics; it is also a rewarding destination for anyone interested in architecture, culture, and the history of science.

Universität Hamburg, Hamburger Sternwarte, Digitales Fotoplattenarchiv
A view of the moon from the observatory in Bergedorf, 1932
Universität Hamburg, Hamburger Sternwarte, Digitales Fotoplattenarchiv
Universität Hamburg, Hamburger Sternwarte, Digitales Fotoplattenarchiv
1215

An Evolving Hospital

The present-day University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE) has been in existence since 1889. It has officially been part of the University since 1934. Even then the “New General Hospital,” located at what was then the city outskirts, could boast the most modern standards: 55 pavilions in the middle of a green park housed patients according to their illnesses. Today the UKE prides itself on short, safe distances between buildings and interdisciplinary treatment under a single roof. The UKE is also deeply involved in medical research and the education and training of over 3,000 medical and dentistry students.
Doctors conversing in Pavillonstraße 20–29 around 1900
Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Medizinhistorisches Museum
Doctors conversing in Pavillonstraße 20–29 around 1900
Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Medizinhistorisches Museum
Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Medizinhistorisches Museum
1216

The unexpected sounds of an organ

In a sea of office buildings, the institutes for musicology offer an oasis of music. The large lecture hall houses an impressive and rare original organ from the Romantic era. Built by the Ludwigsburg firm E. F. Walcker in 1895, the organ has been in the possession of the musicology department since 1971. It can still be heard in concerts or when researchers and students pull out the stops. The building is also home to the Musicology Library, which houses a collection of scores and sound storage media. University Music ensembles also practice here weekly.
Musicology’s Walcker Organ, 2015
Universität Hamburg, Foto: Olga Sukhina
Rare object: Musicology’s Walcker Organ, 2015